New Jersey Scuba Diving

Long Island Sound

Long Island Sound averages 60 ft in depth, with the greatest depth of over 300 ft at the eastern end. Tidal effects are strongest at the narrow western end, where all the inrushing water flow piles up and makes tidal variations of up to 7 ft. Strong tidal currents are also prevalent, and visibility tends to be poorer than the open ocean, especially at depth.


Atlantic

Long Island West Chart

Type:
shipwreck, steamer, USA
Built:
May 1846, New York NY USA
Specs:
( 320 x 36 ft ) 1112 gross tons, 75 passengers & crew
Sunk:
Friday November 26, 1846
boiler explosion; then grounded during storm on Fisher's Island - 45 casualties
Depth:
20 ft

ATLANTIC:
~ Built 1846, At NEW YORK ~

HULL of wood, built by Bishop & Simonson

ENGINE, Vertical beam, constructed by T.F. Secor & Co., New York. Diameter of cylinder 72 inches by 11 feet stroke. Horsepower 1400

BOILERS, Two,
of iron, on guards

Joiner work, by Chas W. Simonson, NY

The keel of the Atlantic was laid in November 1845, and she was launched in May 1846. She was owned by the Norwich & Worcester Railroad Company, and was built for the New York, New London and Norwich line, and cost $150,000, being one of the largest and finest steamboats that had ever been constructed for Long Island Sound. Her commodious saloons and staterooms, the elegance of her fittings and appointments, the finish of her boilers and engine, and speed placed her in the front ranks of Sound boats of her day. A novelty was the introduction of gas as light on board - probably the first steamboat to be so equipped. She commenced her regular trips from New York on August 18, 1846. On November 27, 1846, she was wrecked by being blown ashore on Fisher's Island, L.I. Sound, being a total loss; about 50 persons perished.

from American Steam Vessels, New York: Smith & Stanton, 1895

Barataria

Long Island East Chart


Type:
shipwreck, tugboat, USA
Built:
1937, Beaumont TX USA
Specs:
( 68 ft ) 4 crew
Sunk:
Tuesday November 25, 1971
structural failure during storm due to improper modifications - 2 casualties
Depth:
136 ft

Celtic / Cape Race

Long Island West Chart

Type:
Celtic - shipwreck, canal tugboat, USA
Cape Race - shipwreck, barge, USA
Built:
Celtic - 1958, USA
Specs:
Celtic - ( 85 ft ) 6 crew
Cape Race - ( 150 ft )
Sunk:
Saturday November 17, 1984
barge foundered, pulling tug down with it - no survivors
Depth:
60 ft

Condor

Long Island West Chart


Type:
shipwreck, tugboat, USA
Specs:
( 70 ft )
Sunk:
Wednesday December 7, 1983
fire - no casualties
Depth:
70 ft

Glen Island

Long Island West Chart

Type:
shipwreck, steamer, USA
Built:
1880, USA, as City of Richmond
Specs:
( 239 x 36 ft ) 615 gross tons, 31 passengers & crew
Sunk:
Saturday December 17, 1904
fire - 9 casualties
Depth:
15 ft

outline of wooden hull, paddlewheel


Gwendolyn Steers

Long Island West Chart


Type:
shipwreck, tugboat, USA
Built:
1888, USA, as J. Rich Steers
Specs:
( 97 x 21 ft ) 148 tons, 7 crew
Sunk:
Sunday December 30, 1962
cause unknown - no survivors
Depth:
55 ft, starts at 27 ft

The Gwendolyn Steers was used to haul gravel from huge gravel pit in Northport to NYC. The loss of the Gwendolyn Steers may have been due to icing in a blizzard, or age and poor maintenance. A week earlier she had been run aground. The wreck sits intact and upright, with usually poor visibility.

Jack Zehner from Vermont writes:

The tug Gwendolyn Steers was renamed after my mother by the Steers. After the sinking she was offered to name another tug, but politely refused. The loss of life upset her very much. It was thought the tow pulled the tug down.

( Editor's note: there was no tow )


John A. Downs

Long Island East Chart


Type:
shipwreck, tugboat, USA
Specs:
( 113 ft ) 8 crew
Sunk:
Sunday March 3, 1985
collision with one of its own barges- no casualties
Depth:
230 ft

Larchmont

Long Island East Chart

Type:
shipwreck, steamer, USA
Built:
1885, Bath ME USA
Specs:
( 252 x 37 ft ) 1605 tons, 351 passengers & crew
Sunk:
Monday February 11, 1907
collision with schooner Harry Knowlton - 334 casualties
Depth:
140 ft

huge paddlewheels; wooden hull draped with fishing nets; hazardous currents & poor viz.


Maine

Long Island West Chart

Type:
shipwreck, liner, USA
Built:
1891, USA
Specs:
( 310 x 44 ft ) 1505 gross tons
Sunk:
Wednesday February 4, 1920
pushed onto rocks by pack ice - no casualties
Depth:
15 ft

low debris field


Myronus

Long Island West Chart


Type:
shipwreck, three-masted schooner, USA
Specs:
( 118 ft )
Sunk:
Monday August 12, 1907
collision with steamer Tennessee- 4 casualties
Depth:
60 ft

wooden ribs and timbers


Olinda

Long Island East Chart

Type:
shipwreck, freighter, Portugal
Built:
1887, England
Specs:
( 250 x 36 ft ) 1479 gross tons
Sunk:
Tuesday June 11, 1895
ran aground on Fisher's Island - no casualties
Depth:
20 ft


Poling Brothers #2

Long Island West Chart

Type:
shipwreck, tanker, USA
Built:
1863, USA
Specs:
( 116 x 23 ft ) 159 tons
Sunk:
Wednesday February 7, 1940
struck pack ice - no casualties
Depth:
65 ft

upright & intact, very poor visibility and strong tidal current


Thames

Long Island East Chart


Type:
shipwreck, tugboat, USA
Built:
1885, USA
Specs:
( 55 ft )
Sunk:
autumn 1973; foundered - no casualties
Depth:
100 ft

Volund

Long Island East Chart

Type:
shipwreck, freighter, Norway
Built:
1889, Norway
Specs:
( 239 ft )
Sunk:
Sept 26, 1908; collision with liner Commonwealth
Depth:
105 ft




Disclaimer:

I make no claim as to the accuracy, validity, or appropriateness of any information found in this website. I will not be responsible for the consequences of any action that is based upon information found here. Scuba diving is an adventure sport, and as always, you alone are responsible for your own safety and well being.

Copyright © 1996-2015 Rich Galiano
unless otherwise noted

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since May 05, 2015