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New Jersey Scuba Diving

Bananas!

New Jersey Scuba Diving

Lana Carol

Manasquan Chart

Shipwreck Lana Carol

Type:
shipwreck, trawler, scallop dredge, USA
Built:
1973, Pascagoula MS USA
Specs:
( 71 x 21 ft ) 104 gross tons, 4 crew
Sunk:
Sunday October 31, 1976
foundered in rough seas - no casualties
Depth:
90 ft

scallopThis little wreck is almost completely intact and upright, although now badly rusted and beginning to cave in. The hatch covers over the cargo holds are missing, and problems with these are probably the reason the vessel sank in the first place. The masts are broken off and lying in the sand, and the entire wreck is covered with sea life. Mussels are a foot thick on the top of the pilot house, along with thick stands of anemones. Lobsters can be caught in the sandy recesses around the hull, and be sure to shine your light into the big washout under the stern, where there is always a big bug lurking well out of reach. This is also sometimes a good wreck for scallops, and even the occasional Blackfish, although this small wreck can quickly be fished out of everything.

blue musselIn the cargo hold, you can see the Lana Carol's final haul of scallops. Higher up, the small cabin is opened up and safely and easily penetrated, although the doorway is a little tight. Under good conditions, this is probably the most picturesque wreck of the New Jersey coast. Over the winter of 2002-2003, storms moved the wreck about 10 feet "forward", leaving her rudder embedded in the sand behind her.

The picture above is a sister ship of the Lana Carol. This vessel appears to be rigged for trawling, rather than scalloping, however. It is possible that this was her original configuration, which was probably for shrimp trawling in the Gulf of Mexico. In any case, it is very similar.

Shipwreck Lana Carol

Shipwreck Lana Carol
The wheelhouse


Looking forward along the starboard side towards the bow

Shipwreck Lana Carol
Stairs, looking aft along the starboard side of the wheelhouse

Shipwreck Lana Carol
Inside the wheelhouse, long-since stripped

Shipwreck Lana Carol
Up on the roof

Shipwreck Lana Carol
Looking forward from the stern


SC-1282 Ida K

Manasquan Chart

subchaser fishing
A subchaser converted to fishing - Ida K might have been similar

Type:
submarine chaser, later trawler, scallop boat, USA
Built:
1943, Elizabeth City NC USA
Specs:
( 112 x 18 ft ) 99 gross tons
Sunk:
???
Depth:
90 ft

subchaser
A World War II subchaser ( model )

WW I submarine chasers
Subchasers under construction, 1917 - typical wood plank-over-frame

The Ida K was a World War II subchaser, SC-1282, launched from the Elizabeth City Shipyard, Elizabeth City NC in February 1943. SC-1282 participated in Operation Overlord - the invasion of Normandy in June 1944. Shallow-draft subchasers were used for forward control of the landings, and so would have been very much in harm's way. Who ever thought this scattering of junk had that kind of history !

Normandy landings
The Normandy landings, June 1944 - Ida K was there

SC-1282 was decommissioned shortly after the war. Sold by the Navy in 1947, originally fished out of Greenport Long Island as Malice - now there's a great name for a boat. Renamed Ida K by a new owner in 1953.

Ida K was brought to Point Pleasant in 1977 for use as a trawler and scallop boat at the beginning of the New Jersey scallop boom. By this time the vessel was already well-worn and near the end of its life. It was re-powered with twin inline-6 diesels, but the old wooden hull was leaky and decrepit, and the strain of trawling finished it. The vessel was deliberately sunk by its owner. ( Making it technically an illegal artificial reef - you can't just take a ship out and sink it. ) Of course, no record of the sinking date, but out of registry by 1989.

On the wreck site there are many metal pieces scattered around and on the remains of a metal-sheathed wood hull. There are several large box-like steel fuel tanks. The wreck contains a great deal of interesting, if worthless, debris.

Shipwreck Ida K
Propane tanks for the galley - valves still evident

Shipwreck Ida K
A masthead? There is all sorts of interesting junk lying around

Shipwreck Ida K
This might be a transmission

The valuable engines and propellers were removed prior to sinking. You can still identify the propeller shafts and associated hardware, including the external shaft bracing. One rudder lies on top, with a shaft passing through a waterproof packing, ending in a tiller arm.

Shipwreck Ida K
This is a shaft packing - the seal where the rotating propeller shaft pierces the hull.

The wreck lies north-south, in as much as it lies in any direction, and which end is the bow is anyone's guess. The bottom is reasonably clean sand, heavily furrowed. Lobster holes are everywhere, and the Ida K produces surprisingly well for such a small wreck. Look for a nice one between the aforementioned cylinders; good luck getting it out. But like any small wreck, a couple of visits could easily wipe it out. No notable fish life when I dived it, so probably not a good wreck for spearfishing.

subchaser
The wooden construction is obvious here

Historical information courtesy of Brad Anderson, who sailed on her in the seventies.


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Disclaimer:

I make no claim as to the accuracy, validity, or appropriateness of any information found in this website. I will not be responsible for the consequences of any action that is based upon information found here. Scuba diving is an adventure sport, and as always, you alone are responsible for your own safety and well being.

Copyright © 1996-2016 Rich Galiano
unless otherwise noted

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