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Fort Victoria

Sandy Hook Chart

Shipwreck Fort Victoria

Type:
shipwreck, liner, Furness-Bermuda Line, Bermuda
Built:
1913, Scotland, as Willochra
Specs:
( 411 x 56 ft ) 7784 gross tons, 371 passengers & crew
Sunk:
Wednesday December 18, 1929
collision in fog with liner Algonquin ( see Mohawk ) - no casualties
GPS:
40°28.907' -73°54.398' (AWOIS 1991)
Depth:
50 ft

The huge Fort Victoria lay on its side in the middle of the shipping lane for over a year. Finally, it was completely demolished ( using 25 tons of dynamite ! ) and wire dragged to a clearance of 42 ft ( in 50 ft of water. ) Virtually nothing is left of her. What is, is almost completely buried in the muddy, sandy bottom.

Shipwreck Fort Victoria

from AWOIS: 1626

H10224/86 -- OPR-C121-WH-86; FOUND DURING MAIN SCHEME HYDROGRAPHY AND SIDE SCAN SONAR OPERATIONS 1200M NORTHWEST OF AWOIS POSITION; DIVER INVESTIGATION REVEALED A VESSEL, AT LEAST 280 FT LONG, 56 FT WIDE, SITTING UPRIGHT IN FINE SAND IN A NORTHEAST-SOUTHWEST DIRECTION; PNEUMATIC DEPTH GAUGE LEAST DEPTH OF 46 FT TAKEN ON STARBOARD SECTION OF BULWARK EXTENDING APPROXIMATELY 9 FT OFF THE BOTTOM. (UPDATED MSD 4/91)

Shipwreck Fort Victoria
TWIN-SCREW 14,000 TON, OIL-BURNING S.S. "FORT VICTORIA" OF THE FURNESS BERMUDA LINE

BERMUDA STEAMSHIP SERVICE

The palatial, twin-screw steamers, S.S. "Fort Victoria" and S.S. "Fort St. George" of the Furness Bermuda Line, under contract with the Bermuda Government, which are now engaged in the New York-Bermuda route, are of the most advanced type, and their splendid accommodation and up-to-date equipment have done much to make the Bermuda trip such a popular one.

The ships are modern steel, twin-screw. oil-burning vessels, and are of the highest class at Lloyds. Each ship has accommodations for about 400 first-class passengers and is strictly a first-class vessel. The state-rooms are comfortable and commodious, all fitted with electric lights, electric fans and running water. Many of the rooms are equipped with beds instead of the customary berths. For those who prefer more luxurious accommodations there are available a number of private suites containing sitting room, bedroom and bath - and also it number of cabins deluxe with private bath. The comfort of the passengers has received the fullest consideration, and the state-rooms on both vessels have an air of good taste and attractiveness which will appeal very strongly to discriminating travelers. Stewards and stewardesses are in attendance at all hours and are prepared to give passengers every possible attention.

Special attention has been given to the furnishing and equipment if the public rooms. All passengers like to spend a portion of the time on shipboard in the music saloon and lounges, and these arc exceptionally roomy and attractive. The smoking rooms are handsomely and comfortably furnished. The dining saloons, in conformity with the best modern practice, are fitted with small tables. This feature will be particularly appreciated by tourists who are traveling in small parties of their own.

In the "Fort Victoria" and "Fort St. George" are exemplified a number of special features which are really new departures in ship construction. For instance, instead of the small port-holes to which the ocean traveler is accustomed, these ships are fitted with windows (on the upper decks, as will be noted from the accompanying illustrations. This is one of the Many new features which have been introduced by the Furness-Bermuda Line to increase the comfort of passengers, and which help to place these ships in the front rank of their class.

The deck space is broad, allowing ample room for deck chairs and also for the pleasant promenade two or three times a day which most people find so invigorating. In the morning hours especially, an easy swing along the deck, fill one's lungs with the fresh bracing sea air, brings a sense of exhilaration and physical well being which is in itself a more than sufficient justification for the trip. A glance at the illustrations will show the broad attractive deck space. There are, of course, a number of deck games which can usually be found in full swing. The lounges, music saloon, smoking room and verandah cafe are all situated on the promenade deck.

The verandah cafe, which vies in popularity with the lounge and other public rooms, is simply a lounging room out of doors, provided with comfortable wicker chairs and convenient tables, where passengers may have their favorite beverages. Here one can pass an occasional pleasant hour in good company, quite removed from the various activities if the ship.

Sailings of the Furness Bermuda Line Steamers on the New York - Bermuda Route are twice weekly, leaving New York on Wednesdays and Saturdays and returning from Bermuda on Tuesdays and Saturdays, Tickets are interchangeable on either steamer, thus offering unequalled express service. The Furness Bermuda Line is under Contract with the Bermuda Government and the ships of this Company are the only steamers in the New York-Bermuda service which land passengers direct at the Hamilton Dock without transfer by tender. Full particulars of rates, sailing dates and other information will he supplied on application to Furness Bermuda Line, 34 Whitehall Street, New York, or to any Local Steamship Ticket Agent.

Shipwreck Fort Victoria

Shipwreck Fort Victoria

Shipwreck Fort VictoriaShipwreck Fort VictoriaShipwreck Fort Victoria

historic materials courtesy of Maritime Timetable Images - www.timetableimages.com

Algonquin
Algonquin, sister of Mohawk, as WWII Army hospital ship


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I make no claim as to the accuracy, validity, or appropriateness of any information found in this website. I will not be responsible for the consequences of any action that is based upon information found here. Scuba diving is an adventure sport, and as always, you alone are responsible for your own safety and well being.

Copyright © 1996-2016 Rich Galiano
unless otherwise noted

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