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New Jersey Scuba Diving

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New Jersey Scuba Diving

I'm looking for recent dive/fishing reports of the Radford. If you've been there in the last year or two, I'd like to hear what you found. In particular, where is the stern now? I can find no reports since 2012.

Cape May Wreck Chart

Dive Sites

GPS Numbers


Admiral Dupont

Cape May Chart

Shipwreck Admiral Dupont

Type:
shipwreck, steamer, USA
Built:
1847, England, as Anglia
Specs:
( 195 x 28 ft ) 750 gross tons, 50 passengers & crew
Sunk:
Thursday June 8, 1865
collision with ship Stadacona - 17 casualties
Depth:
150 ft

The wreckage at the site plotted is a likely match for the iron-hulled side wheel steamship Admiral Dupont.

Shipwreck Admiral Dupont New York Times


Alex Gibson

Cape May Chart


Type:
shipwreck, barge
Built:
1877
Specs:
( 180 ft ) 2154 tons
Sunk:
1930s, no casualties
Depth:
40 ft

The Alex Gibson shipwreck is the remains of a wood barge. The barge was built in 1877 was 180 ft long and displaced 2154 tons. She was sunk in the 1930's and now sits in 40 ft of water on a clean sand bottom.


Almirante ( "Flour Wreck" )

Cape May Chart

Shipwreck Almirante

Type:
shipwreck, freighter, USA
Built:
1909, Ireland
Specs:
( 378 x 50 ft ) 3121 gross tons, 105 passengers & crew
Sunk:
Friday September 6, 1918
collision with U.S. Navy tanker Hisko - 5 casualties
Depth:
70 ft

The Almirante was a United Fruit Company steamship bound from New York City to Colon, Panama with a full cargo hold. On Friday September 6, 1918 at 2:00 a.m. The 15,000-ton Navy tanker USS Hisko rammed the Almirante in heavy seas and fog. The ship sank within 4 minutes, with an amazingly small loss of 5 lives out of 105 crew and passengers due to the prompt rescue by the Hisko crew and the Lifesaving Corps ( the precursor to the Coast Guard ) from Atlantic City. The entire cargo was lost, including 26 sacks of mail. The Hisko suffered some bow damage, but was able to safely continue on to New York.

The wreck site is more commonly called the "Flour Wreck, " due to the white foam that washed onto the shore after the Almirante sank. For days after the wreck the local beaches were covered with a doughy, frothy mess. Because of this it was thought that large part of her cargo was flour, so the Almirante is known as the Flour Wreck, however the ship's manifest indicates that it was carrying a cargo of fruit, not flour. Flour from the galley may have been responsible for the mess but the quantity carried for consumption is not known, making any explanation pure conjecture.

The wreck lies scattered on the ocean floor in 70 feet of water. The wreck was twice blown up, wire dragged in 1938, and again in 1950. In addition, on a submarine patrol during July 1942, the blimp K-7 spotted the shape of the wreck from the air, and reported it as a possible U-boat. Coast Guard Cutter #464 dropped 5 depth charges on the wreck, further destroying it. Because of this, the wreck is mostly rubble with few identifiable parts. The Almirante is a great site for student divers because it is shallow, offers artifacts, is very scenic and its overlapping hull plates are an ideal habitat for lobsters and fish. Divers frequently spot sea bass, blackfish, eelpouts, harbor fluke and ling. The Almirante is a commonly visited site since it offers good visibility even when nearby wrecks have poor vis.

Shipwreck Almirante

Hisko
USS Hisko, refueling two four-stack destroyers


American ( "American Oil Barge" )

Cape May Chart

Shipwreck American Oil Barge

Type:
shipwreck, private yacht converted to oil barge, USA
Built:
1898, New York NY USA
Specs:
( 218 x 23 ft ) 836 gross tons
Sunk:
Wednesday October 14, 1925
foundered - no casualties
Depth:
55 ft

partially intact steel hull


Astra

Cape May Chart

Shipwreck Astra

Type:
shipwreck, freighter, Denmark
Name:
Astra is Latin for star.
Built:
1945, Denmark, as Gudnaes
Specs:
( 333 x 51 ft ) 2709 gross tons, 105 passengers & crew
Sunk:
Friday March 30, 1951
collision with freighter Steel Inventor ( 5689 tons) - 5 casualties
Depth:
85 ft

Today the Astra sits in 85 ft of water on a sandy bottom. Her stern is intact and lists to port. The rest of the ship sits upright, her midsection collapsed. She can be easily penetrated, and is a great photography wreck. The stern has the greatest relief, coming 25 ft or so off the sand. Parts of automobiles are spread around the wreckage.

Shipwreck Astra New York Times

shipwreck Astra Coast Guard Report

Steel Inventor
Steel Inventor - scrapped in Japan 1954


Azua

Cape May Chart


Type:
shipwreck, 4 masted schooner, USA
Built:
1918, New York NY USA
Specs:
( 171 x 34 ft ) 664 gross tons, 8 crew
Sunk:
Wednesday May 14, 1930
collision with liner City of Atlanta - no casualties
Depth:
130 ft

City of Atlanta
City of Atlanta


Brian C

Cape May Chart

Shipwreck Brian C

Type:
shipwreck, tugboat, USA
Built:
1948, New Orleans LA USA, as John Cushman
Specs:
( 86 x 21 ft ) 136 gross tons, 4 crew
Sunk:
Tuesday November 13, 1979
foundered in storm - no casualties
Depth:
150 ft

intact


"Brigantine Buoy Wreck" ( "Fall River" )

Cape May Chart


Type:
shipwreck, barge
Specs:
( 200 ft ) 1759 tons, 4 crew
Sunk:
Tuesday November 1, 1932
foundered - no casualties
Depth:
70 ft

wooden


car float

Cape May Chart


Type:
shipwreck, barge
Specs:
( 270 x 25 ft )
Depth:
60 ft

partially intact, railroad car debris nearby


Cassandra

Cape May Chart

Shipwreck Cassandra

Type:
shipwreck, steamer, USA
Built:
1864, Mystic CT USA
Specs:
( 207 x 35 ft ) 1284 gross tons
Sunk:
Tuesday February 5, 1867
ran aground - no casualties

wood-hulled, location unconfirmed


Champion

Cape May Chart

Shipwreck Champion

Type:
shipwreck, steamer, USA
Built:
1859, Wilmington DE USA
Specs:
( 234 x 31 ft ) 1419 gross tons, 55 passengers & crew
Sunk:
Friday November 7, 1879
collision with sailing ship Lady Octavia - 28 casualties
Depth:
105 ft

The wreckage at the site plotted is a likely match for the iron-hulled side wheel steamship Champion.

Shipwreck Champion
The "Inshore Paddlewheeler" - the same ?


"China Wreck"

Cape May Chart


Type:
shipwreck, sailing ship
Specs:
( 140 ft ? )
Depth:
45 ft

The "China Wreck" is the partial remains of an unidentified late 19th century wooden sailing ship, with a cargo of china plates and cups, and miscellaneous articles. The wreck must be dived at slack tide, and even then conditions at the mouth of Delaware Bay tend to be muddy. The plates themselves date from about 1875, and are fairly ordinary and of little value except to divers who prize such artifacts; and despite years of plunder, there are still more to be found.


Clermont

Cape May Chart


Type:
shipwreck, dredge
Sunk:
Saturday January 8, 1927

The Clermont was at one time the world's largest dredge. She was sunk in a storm while under tow on January 8, 1927. Today she sits upright on a sandy bottom, partially intact, rising 15' off the bottom. Some of the dredge pipes are visible in the sand off the starboard side of the wreck. Divers have recovered several interesting objects from the wreck such as deck prisms and bricks from the boiler stamped "Weideimer".


"China Junk Wreck"

Cape May Chart


Type:
shipwreck, schooner ???
Depth:
30 ft

The "China Junk Wreck" by Townsend inlet rises up to 15 ft. What you can see is a couple of boilers and a debris field. To dive it you must hit the tide just right. On a good day you can see 15-20 ft. A good tog spearfishing site.

Description courtesy of diver Brian Larsen.


City of Georgetown

Cape May Chart

Shipwreck City of Georgetown

Type:
shipwreck, schooner, USA
Built:
1902, Bath Me USA
Specs:
( 168 x 36 ft ) 599 gross tons, 8+ passengers & crew
Sunk:
Sunday June 2, 1918
collision with liner Prinz Oskar ( 1090 tons) - no casualties
Depth:
110 ft

Today the wreckage lies in 110 ft of water. She has little relief, maybe 5 ft. Her wooden hull is pretty much sanded in and appears to be split into three sections. She is mostly frequented by fishing boats, so watch out for hooks and monofilament.

Prinz Oskar
Prinz Oskar


Dorothy B. Barrett

Cape May Chart

Shipwreck Dorothy B. Barrett

Type:
shipwreck, schooner, USA
Built:
1904, Bath ME USA
Specs:
( 259 x 45 ft ) 2088 gross tons, 10 crew
Sunk:
Wednesday August 14, 1918
shelled by U-117 - no casualties
Depth:
60 ft

low debris field mostly buried in the sand


Elizabeth Warren ( "Southern Pet Wreck" )

Cape May Chart


Type:
shipwreck, trawler, clam dredge, USA
Sunk:
early 1960's
Depth:
50 ft

Eugene F. Moran

Cape May Chart

Shipwreck Eugene F. Moran
This is almost certainly not the 1902 Eugene F Moran, but her 1944 namesake. The older vessel would have had a tall skinny stack for the steam boiler, not a short diesel-style stack. It's a good picture anyway.

Type:
shipwreck, tugboat, USA
Built:
1902, Philadelphia PA USA
Specs:
( 91 x 22 ft ) 164 gross tons, 11 crew
Sunk:
Sunday December 9, 1917
foundered in storm - no survivors
Depth:
25 ft

Built in 1902, by the Neafie and Levy Engine Building Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania as the Charles E. Matthews for the Dailey and Ivins Company. In 1906, the tug was acquired by the Moran Towing Company of New York, New York, and renamed as the Eugene F. Moran. In 1916, she was acquired by the British Government. However, the tug was lost while in transit to her new owners. She was a single screw tug, rated at 1,000 horsepower.

Shipwreck Eugene F. Moran
The Eugene F Moran's (probable) twin sister Julia C Moran of 1902

completely demolished

Photo courtesy of McAllister Towing.


"Evening Star" ( "Pig Iron Wreck" )

Cape May Chart


Type:
shipwreck, tanker
Depth:
40 ft

The Evening Star or 'Pig Iron Wreck' appears to be the remains of a tanker that ran aground and broke up. The wreck sits in 40 ft of water and is scattered over a relatively large area.


Florida

Cape May Chart

Shipwreck Florida

Type:
shipwreck, steamer, USA
Built:
1876, Baltimore MD USA
Specs:
( 259 x 36 ft ) 1280 gross tons, no crew
Sunk:
Wednesday May 14, 1930
foundered in storm while being towed to wreckers - no casualties
Depth:
shallow

unknown, probably buried


Gypsum Prince

Cape May Chart

Shipwreck Gypsum Prince

Type:
shipwreck, freighter, England
Built:
1927, England
Specs:
( 347 x 52 ft ) 3915 gross tons, 26 crew
Sunk:
Sunday May 3, 1942
collision with freighter Voco ( 5090 tons) - 6 casualties
Depth:
70 ft

Today the Gypsum Prince sits in 80 ft of water on a sandy bottom. She was blown up in August of 1942 because she was a hazard to navigation, and today she is almost completely torn apart - a mass of twisted metal and hull plates. All this gives good cover for lobster and fish. She is a hard wreck to dive because of her location at the end of the Cape Henlopen Breakwater. Current can be very fast and visibility is usually poor, diving at slack tide is strongly suggested.

Voco
The Voco was also involved in the collision that sank the Choapa.


Hornet

Cape May Chart


Type:
shipwreck, barge
Specs:
( 70 ft )
Depth:
50 ft

intact, steel


King Cobra

Cape May Chart

Shipwreck King Cobra

Type:
shipwreck, tugboat, USA
Built:
1887, Philadelphia PA USA, as Beverly Francis
Specs:
( 67 x 16 ft ) 52 gross tons, 4 crew
Sunk:
Wednesday January 3, 1979
unknown cause - no survivors
Depth:
45 ft

The King Cobra lies on upright on a sandy bottom, intact, and rising 15-20 ft off the bottom. Her steel deck plating has eroded and she can be easily penetrated. There is usually a steady current so caution is advised. Some lower sections are sanded in.



Lemuel Burrows

Cape May Chart

Shipwreck Lemuel Burrows

Type:
shipwreck, collier, USA
Built:
1917, Camden NJ USA, as Deepwater
Specs:
( 437 x 63 ft ) 7610 gross tons, 34 crew
Sunk:
Saturday March 14, 1942
torpedoed by U-404 - 20 casualties
Depth:
80 ft

The Lemuel Burrows was torn apart by three torpedoes*, and subsequently wire dragged twice. Today she sits in 80 ft of water on a sandy bottom. She is quite broken up, and a pretty good lobster wreck, still occasionally giving up some nice brass artifacts as well. Sometimes called "The Collier", she is dived often. Visibility is typical for the area, averaging 10-20 ft. Newer divers should heed the many overhangs, which could bring about an inadvertent penetration.

The U-404 sank the Tolten the day before.

* Waste three torpedoes on an old collier ? The U-boat skipper was probably just trying to get rid of his "fish" so he could go home.

U-404
Type VIIC U-boat U-404, note Viking-ship decoration, sunk July 1943


Manhattan / Powhattan

Cape May Chart


Type:
shipwreck, sailing ships
Sunk:
Sunday April 16, 1854
foundered in storm
Depth:
35 ft

The packet ship Manhattan sank with eight of her nine crew. In the same storm, the 200 ft schooner Powhattan was also lost nearby, with over 350 immigrants on board and no survivors. Neither wreck has been positively identified, although there are several candidates, including one old wooden hull buried up to the gunwales in the sand.


Misty Blue

Cape May Chart

Shipwreck Misty Blue

Type:
shipwreck, trawler, clam dredge, USA
Built:
1976, Mississippi USA
Specs:
( 85 x 24 ft ) 145 gross tons, 4 crew
Sunk:
Tuesday April 12, 1983
cause unknown - no survivors
Depth:
120 ft

Today the Misty Blue lies in 120 ft of water on her starboard side, intact Clam cages and other debris surround the wreck site. She is not dived often.

Shipwreck Misty Blue
The masthead light


Montgomery

Cape May Chart

Shipwreck Montgomery

Type:
shipwreck, steamer, USA
Built:
1858, New York NY USA
Specs:
( 198 x 29 ft ) 1100 gross tons
Sunk:
Sunday January 7, 1877
collision with schooner Seminole - 13 casualties
Depth:
150 ft

The wreckage at the site plotted is a likely match for the wooden-hulled screw steamship Montgomery.

Shipwreck Montgomery NYT


Northern 29 ( "Whopper" )

Cape May Chart


Type:
shipwreck, barge
Built:
1918
Specs:
1267 tons
Sunk:
Sunday December 10, 1933
foundered in rough seas
Depth:
70 ft

low lying wood & metal debris field


Nuphar

Cape May Chart


Type:
shipwreck, iron-hulled screw steamer
Built:
1881, England
Specs:
( 287 x 37 ft ) 1963 gross tons
Sunk:
Saturday September 23, 1882
ran aground - no casualties

Coast Guard records denote this wreck as "disproved" - no longer there. It was removed as a hazard to navigation.

Shipwreck Nuphar NYT


Patrice McAllister

Cape May Chart

Shipwreck Patrice McAllister

Type:
shipwreck, tugboat, USA
Built:
1919, New Orleans LA USA, as Degrey
Specs:
( 94 x 24 ft ) 201 gross tons, no crew
Sunk:
Monday October 4, 1976
foundered in storm while under tow - no casualties
Depth:
55 ft

Small tugboats are not always the most seaworthy vessels, and this one proves the point. She lies upright and intact, 55 ft down.

Shipwreck Patrice McAllister
Patrice McAllister in 1976, shortly before her loss

Built in 1919, by Johnson Iron Works of New Orleans, Louisiana (hull #135) as the Degrey for the United States Shipping Board. In 1920, she was reassigned to the United States Army. The tug was later reassigned to the United States Army Corps of Engineersand designated as the Major Frazer. She was later acquired by the Avondale Towing Line of New York, New York and renamed M&J Tracy. In 1957, the tug acquired by the McAllister Brothers Towing Company of New York, New Yorkand renamed Patrice McAllister.

On October 4th, 1976 the Patrice McAllister was in tow by the tug Judith McAllister, en route from Camden, New Jersey to Jersey City, New Jersey, where the Patrice McAllister would undergo an overhaul of her main engine. The wind increased and sea conditions deteriorated. The Patrice McAllister began to take on water, and eventually sank off of Atlantic City, New Jersey. The Judith McAllister was still attached to the wreck by her towing hawser, and stayed directly over the wreck until the Coast Guard was able mark the location with a buoy. The Patrice McAllister is still sitting upright and intact in 55 ft of water. Repowered in 1957, she was a single screw tug rated at 1,600 horsepower.

Shipwreck Patrice McAllister


"Pet Wreck"

Cape May Chart


Type:
shipwreck, barge
Specs:
( 120 ft )
Depth:
55 ft

The "Pet Wreck" appears to be the remains of a wooden barge sunk in 60' of water 6 miles off Atlantic City. Partially intact but low lying, the wreck is good for both lobster and spearfishing. Look for lobster hiding under the large winch still in place on the forward section of the wreck.


Poseidon

Cape May Chart

Shipwreck Poseidon

Type:
shipwreck, iron-hulled screw steamer, USA
Built:
1914, Scotland
Specs:
( 295 x 43 ft ) 1909 tons
Sunk:
Wednesday July 31, 1918
collision with freighter SS Somerset
Depth:
90 ft

This steamer of 1,909 tons was built in 1914 by Dunlop-Bremner & Co, Port Glasgow, for N. V. Koninklijke Nederlandsche Stmbt Maats in Amsterdam. The Poseidon was powered by a steam, triple expansion engine, single screw giving 10.5 knots. In 1918 she was requisitioned by the US Government. On the 31st July 1918 she sank after a collision with the SS Somerset five miles NNE of Five Fathom Bank Lightship, on passage from Boston to Norfolk, Virginia.

This wreck is also known as the "Little Oiler" and has also been nick-named the "Steel Wreck". A good lobster wreck in 90 feet of water makes her an interesting and fun dive. Most everything found so far on the wreck has been steel, including portholes, which indicates she may have been salvaged after sinking. The highest section is the boilers, although much of the wreck is buried. The rudder and the blades of the steel propeller sticks up off the muddy bottom.

Somerset
Somerset in WWII camouflage


Ranald ( "Reynolds" )

Cape May Chart


Type:
shipwreck, iron-hulled screw steamer
Built:
1878, Scotland, as Clan Ranald
Specs:
( 305 x 34 ft ) 2008 gross tons
Sunk:
Tuesday June 4, 1901
foundered when cargo of asphalt melted and shifted - no casualties
Depth:
40 ft

on port side, pointing south
generally poor visibility, mud bottom

Shipwreck Ranald NYT


Salem

Cape May Chart


Type:
shipwreck, schooner barge
Built:
1900
Specs:
703 tons, 3 crew
Sunk:
Sunday April 3, 1932
- no survivors
Depth:
55 ft


Sea Girt

Cape May Chart


Type:
shipwreck, trawler, clam dredge
Specs:
( 120 ft )
Sunk:
August 1990
Depth:
65 ft

intact, upright, steel hull


'Slabs'

Cape May Chart


Type:
rock pile
Depth:
60 ft

field of huge granite slabs


Wayne

Cape May Chart


Type:
shipwreck, barge
Specs:
436 tons
Sunk:
Wednesday May 25, 1932
Depth:
45 ft

wooden


William B. Diggs

Cape May Chart


Type:
shipwreck, barge
Built:
1918
Specs:
1041 tons
Sunk:
Monday September 3, 1934
foundered - no casualties
Depth:
42 ft

The Diggs was engaged in a salvage operation at the time of her loss, and actually settled on top of another shipwreck, of unknown origin. The green blinker buoy for which it is known was removed after the wooden wreck was demolished in the 1970s. Also known as the "Green Blinker Wreck".


YP-387

Cape May Chart

YP-389
Sister YP-389, built in the same yard at the same time to the same specs

Type:
shipwreck, patrol boat, U.S. Navy, converted trawler
Built:
1941, Quincy MA, USA, as Salem
Specs:
( 102 x 22 ft ) 301 tons, 21 crew
Sunk:
Wednesday May 20, 1942
collision with collier Jason - 6 casualties
Depth:
40 ft

On 10 September 1947, Windlass, in company with Salvager, began searching for the sunken YP-387. She located the wreck and began salvage operations while Salvager returned to Bayonne, apparently to get necessary equipment. Windlass apparently shifted briefly to Norfolk, Va., for the same reason before both heavy lifting salvage vessels returned to the site of the sunken YP off Hereford, N.J., on 1 October 1947. Two days later, they placed demolition charges in the sunken "Yippie boat" and blew her up to prevent her from being a hazard to navigation.

-- exact location unknown

From: the Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships

The Navy acquired three of these "Yippie" boats together, identical sisters. They all came to bad ends. The YP-387 was sunk in a collision off Cape May. The YP-389 was sunk by gunfire of the U-701 in 1942, unable to fight back because her one 3" gun was broken. The YP-388 sank in a collision in Boston harbor in 1951, and was not raised for almost a year.

YP-388
YP-388
Identical sister YP-388, raised by the craneship Kearsarge, and looking like a prototype for an artificial reef.

YP-389
YP-389 sidescan sonar image in 2009, depth: 300 ft

Navy Yippie boats
These modern Navy "Yippie" (YP) boats are a common summer sight.
They are used to train cadets in boat handling and seamanship, and are
usually found in groups of four or more, executing synchronized maneuvers.

Jason
Jason as USS Jason


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Disclaimer:

I make no claim as to the accuracy, validity, or appropriateness of any information found in this website. I will not be responsible for the consequences of any action that is based upon information found here. Scuba diving is an adventure sport, and as always, you alone are responsible for your own safety and well being.

Copyright © 1996-2016 Rich Galiano
unless otherwise noted

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