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New Jersey Scuba Diving

Barnegat Wreck Chart

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GPS Numbers


"Brick barge"

Barnegat Chart


Type:
shipwreck, barge

Caddo

Barnegat Chart


Type:
shipwreck, barge
Specs:
432 tons
Sunk:
Friday August 26, 1921
Depth:
65 ft

Chaparra

Barnegat Chart

Shipwreck Chaparra

Type:
shipwreck, freighter, Cuba
Name:
a seaport in northeastern Cuba
also Spanish for "cowboy" or slang for "shorty"
Built:
1906, Scotland, as Tinhow
Specs:
( 249 x 38 ft ) 1510 gross tons, 29 crew
Sunk:
Sunday October 27, 1918
struck mine laid by U-117 - 6 casualties
Depth:
80 ft

Today the Chaparra lies in 80 ft of water on a sandy bottom. Her hull lies on its port side, and is flattened out. The bow offers the most relief off the bottom. Her boilers and engine still visible, some portions covered by large hull plates. She is generally a good lobster wreck. Artifacts can still be found, digging is usually needed. She is sometimes called the Offshore Barge. A mine from the U-117 also sank the San Saba.

U-117
U-117, sunk as a target 1921


Charlemagne Tower Jr.

Barnegat Chart

Shipwreck Charlemagne Tower

Type:
shipwreck, Great Lakes ore carrier, USA
Built:
1888, Cleveland OH USA
Specs:
( 255 x 40 ft ) 1825 gross tons, 19 crew
Sunk:
Friday March 6, 1914
foundered in rough seas - no casualties
Depth:
75 ft

Unable to keep way in rough seas because of failing engines, the wood-hulled Charlemagne Tower was running for the shore to beach herself when she foundered and sank. Her remains consist of a low debris field, boiler, etc. Also known as the "Cedar Creek Wreck."

Shipwreck Charlemagne Tower


F.F. Clain

Barnegat Chart


Type:
shipwreck, barge
Specs:
963 tons
Sunk:
Wednesday February 17, 1943
possibly collision with Harry Rush
Depth:
75 ft


clam boat

Barnegat Chart


Type:
shipwreck, trawler

This site is really just a jumble of machinery. Anything resembling a ship has long-since disappeared. Various clues around the site would seem to indicate a wooden-hulled trawler, probably built before the war ( WWII ) and sunk some time after.


Gassoon

Barnegat Chart


Type:
shipwreck, schooner barge
Depth:
80 ft

Another schooner barge or sailing ship. Close to shore and very near the Maurice Tracy. It is sometimes a second or third dive because of this. She's in 70 feet of water on a sandy seafloor. Lots of wood walls and some decking, its been better for spearfishing lately rather than bugs, but that'll depend on when she was last dived.

Named after the fishing boat that found the spot.


Harry Rush

Barnegat Chart


Type:
shipwreck, sailing ship
Specs:
965 tons
Sunk:
Wednesday February 17, 1943
possibly collision with barge F.F. Clain
Depth:
80 ft

The Harry Rush is described as a freighter by Krotee, not always the most reliable source. The wreck commonly known as the Harry Rush is a sailing ship. The wreck is the typical three parallel wooden walls, very low-lying, with some steam machinery and chain pile at the west end. The orientation of the wreck is unusual, as if it sank while running for the shore, rather than riding out a storm. The absence of towing bits makes it likely this was a true sailing ship rather than a schooner barge.


Mediator

Barnegat Chart


Type:
shipwreck, steamer
Sunk:
Friday January 22, 1875

Shipwreck Mediator NYT


"Northwest Barges"

Barnegat Chart


Type:
shipwreck, barges
Depth:
70 ft

7-9 unidentified wooden barges. Lots of wood decking and low-lying walls which go a long ways.


Peerless

Barnegat Chart


Type:
shipwreck, trawler
Sunk:
1951

Persephone

Barnegat Chart

Shipwreck Persephone

Type:
shipwreck, tanker, Panama
Name:
In Greek mythology, Persephone, the beautiful daughter of Zeus and Demeter, was abducted by Hades, the god of the underworld. Eventually, an agreement was reached wherein Persephone would spend part of the year with Hades in the underworld, and the rest with her parents in Olympus, resulting in the seasons: when she is away, her grieving mother, the earth goddess, ignores her duties and the earth becomes barren - winter.
Built:
1926, Germany
Specs:
( 468 x 63 ft ) 8426 gross tons, 37 crew
Sunk:
Monday May 25, 1942
torpedoed by U-593 - 9 casualties
Depth:
55 ft

Shipwreck Persephone
Shipwreck Persephone

The bow of the Persephone was broken off and towed to New York by salvagers. 21,000 barrels of oil were saved, and her midship house was removed intact and placed on the tanker Livingston Roe. The rest of the wreck was blown up by the Coast Guard after being struck more than once by passing vessels.

Only a debris field of overlapping hull plates remains, no longer ship-like. Many of the plates are twisted into fantastic shapes that would undoubtedly fetch a high price on the modern art market if they were above water.

U-593
Type VIIC U-boat U-593, sunk December 1943


Reliable

Barnegat Chart


Type:
shipwreck, trawler
Built:
1918
Specs:
( 104 x 15 ft ) 83 tons
Sunk:
May 25, 1949

Krotee has a rather confused listing for a wooden trawler Reliable ( which he also calls Sea Hag ) sunk in this vicinity.


"Sachem"

Barnegat Chart

The "Sachem" wreck is typical of the remains of many unknown wooden sailing ships that are found off the coast. Three parallel sets of ribs and scattered decking between provide good habitat for lobster. The wreck sits in 60' of water on a clean sandy bottom and visibility is usually good on this site. Fairly large and scattered, it also provides good opportunity for the spearfisherman.


San Saba ( "Magnolia" )

Barnegat Chart

Shipwreck San Saba

Type:
shipwreck, freighter, USA
Name:
San Saba is a river in central Texas, a tributary of the Colorado River of Texas.
Built:
1879, Chester PA USA, as Colorado
Specs:
( 306 x 39 ft ) 2458 gross tons, 37 crew
Sunk:
Friday October 4, 1918
struck mine laid by U-117 - 30 casualties
Depth:
80 ft

Being a hazard to navigation, the iron hulled San Saba was demolished a week after sinking. Today she sits in 80 ft of water in two mangled pieces of wreckage. The bow section is a jumble of hull plates, with winches and other machinery still visible. The stern section, some 250 ft away is also broken up. The boilers are still visible at the end closest to the bow. Her propeller can still be found, as well as wreckage off to the starboard side. Many artifacts can still be found. Glassware, brass, .22 caliber bullets, and china are still being brought up with a little digging. The San Saba is sometimes called the "Southwest Barge", or the "Magnolia Wreck", for the anti-friction metal bars she was carrying.

Shipwreck San Saba

A mine from the U-117 also sank the Chaparra.

U-117
U-117, sunk as a target 1921


Sea Hag

Barnegat Chart


Type:
shipwreck, sailing ship
Depth:
85 ft

A large wooden sailing ship, more intact than most. The hull is almost complete, 8-10 feet high, with a Navy-style stockless anchor in one side of the bow, and bowsprit lying in the sand below. The bowsprit indicates that this was a true sailing ship, and not a schooner barge. I saw no sign of towing bits, bow or stern. The stern is broken down.

Shipwreck Sea Hag
The anchor

Shipwreck Sea Hag
Shipwreck Sea Hag
The "billetted" bow - reinforced for a bowsprit

Shipwreck Sea Hag

Machinery near the bow

Shipwreck Sea Hag
Donkey boiler near the bow

Shipwreck Sea Hag
The broken stern, from inside ...

Shipwreck Sea Hag
... and outside


Simala

Barnegat Chart


Type:
shipwreck, sailing ship
Specs:
1000 tons, 20 crew
Sunk:
Saturday January 6, 1877
foundered in storm - no casualties

wooden , alternately buried and exposed


Sumner

Barnegat Chart

Shipwreck Sumner

Type:
shipwreck, collier, converted to passenger freighter, USA
Built:
1883, Germany, as Rhaetia
Specs:
( 351 x 43 ft ) 3553 gross tons, 232+ passengers & crew
Sunk:
Tuesday December 12, 1916
ran aground - no casualties
Depth:
25 ft

low debris field, possibly buried, 300 yards offshore

Shipwreck Sumner


Troop Carrier

Barnegat Chart


Specs:
Landing Craft?
Sunk:
during World War II ?
Depth:
20 ft

This wreck is described only as a "Troop Carrier" from World War II. Given its location, I would guess that what is meant by this is most likely a landing craft; probably lost in an accident during an amphibious training exercise by the Army.


"Vivian"

Barnegat Chart


Type:
shipwreck, sailing ship
Depth:
80 ft

A large wooden wreck, with a massive central keel, and very low-lying side walls. Scattered large machinery, chain, and old-style anchor at the west end.


William R. Farrell

Barnegat Chart

William R. Farrell

Type:
shipwreck, tugboat, USA
Built:
1900
Specs:
( 61 ft )
Sunk:
1979
Depth:
55 ft

This small harbor tug was bought by someone who wanted to convert it to some other-than-tug use, but it was lost and is now sitting on its port side in 55 ft of water, with the port railing right at the sand. The starboard hull is completely exposed, and there is an opening through it into the engine room that is large enough for a diver to enter. Apparently there was a failed attempt to salvage the engine. There are also two less hazardous entry points - the topside access, which is very large, and a port side hatchway.

Otherwise, the wreck is in pretty good shape, and covered with white cold-water corals which gave it a "glow" in the clear shallow water. On this dive we had 60+ feet vis everywhere except within about 5 ft of the sand - blue 68°F water above the thermocline. There were baitfish and a large-ish Barracuda there, along with a large collection of Conger Eels and other common Atlantic shore fish. We also saw a juvenile Spotfin Butterfly hiding in one of the starboard side fenders. A fun wreck to explore inside and out, especially given the warm, clear water.

Also known as the "Harvey Cedars Wreck"

Description courtesy of diver Art Greenberg


"Yellow Flag"

Barnegat Chart


Type:
shipwreck, schooner
Depth:
75 ft

wooden


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Disclaimer:

I make no claim as to the accuracy, validity, or appropriateness of any information found in this website. I will not be responsible for the consequences of any action that is based upon information found here. Scuba diving is an adventure sport, and as always, you alone are responsible for your own safety and well being.

Copyright © 1996-2016 Rich Galiano
unless otherwise noted

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