Scuba Diving - New Jersey & Long Island New York

Scuba Diving - New Jersey & Long Island New York

Dive Sites - Long Island - West

List

Click on chart labels


 

Do not ask for numbers - I will not give them out !


 

" 3/4 Tug"

 

Type:
shipwreck, tugboat
Depth:
135 ft

(c) AquaExplorers

Location courtesy of Capt. Dan Berg of Aqua Explorers.


 

"59-Pounder"

 

Depth:
110 ft

wooden ribs


 

Acara ( "Tea Wreck" )

Acara

Type:
shipwreck, freighter, England
Built:
1898, England
Specs:
( 380 x 47 ft ) 4193 gross tons
Sunk:
March 1, 1902; ran aground in storm - no casualties
Depth:
25 ft

New York TimesThe Acara lies 1,500 to 1,800 ft off shore, in 25 ft of water. She is quite broken up, with wreckage spread over a wide area. Still, there are one or two sections with 10 ft or so of relief. brass fittings and other artifacts are still being found.

Visibility depends upon surge conditions, usually ranging from 5-20 ft.
 


 

"Arnoff"

(c) AquaExplorers

Type:
shipwreck, schooner barge
Specs:
( 200 ft est.)
Sunk:
late 1800's ?
Depth:
80 ft


 

"Bug Light"

 

Type:
lighthouse

Probably refers to any of the several harbor lighthouses, which are built on islands of rubble stone and are reputed to be good lobster sites.

Note that many of these fall under New York lobster laws !

Location courtesy of Capt. Dan Berg of AquaExplorers.


 

Burnside

 

Type:
shipwreck, schooner
Specs:
855 tons
Sunk:
Sunday April 20, 1913


 

Charles E. Dunlap ( "Coconut Wreck" )

Charles Dunlap

Type:
shipwreck, schooner, USA
Built:
1904, Millbridge ME USA
Specs:
( 225 x 42 ft ) 1498 gross tons
Sunk:
July 22, 1919; ran aground in fog
Depth:
25 ft

low wooden debris field, coconuts


 

Coastwise

Coastwise

Type:
shipwreck, tugboat, USA
Built:
1900, Perth Amboy NJ USA
Specs:
( 109 x 24 ft ) 268 gross tons, 17 crew
Sunk:
Monday July 19, 1920
sprung a leak - no casualties
Depth:
110 ft

wooden


 

Cornelia Soule ( "Granite Wreck" )

Cornelia Soule

Type:
shipwreck, schooner, USA
Specs:
306 tons, 6 crew
Sunk:
Saturday April 26, 1902
ran aground in bad weather - no casualties
Depth:
25 ft

 

(c) AquaExplorersCornelia Soule

The Cornelia Soule was a 306 ton three-masted schooner. She was bound from Maine to Philadelphia, heavily loaded with a cargo of cut granite jetty stones at the time of her demise.

On April 26, 1902, during a heavy sea and gale force wind, the vessel ran aground on Rockaway Shoals. Because of the heavy sea, lifesavers could not reach the schooner until the next morning. At that time, Captain Bennett and his entire crew of five men were rescued and treated for exposure ailments.

(c) AquaExplorersBecause of the cargo she was carrying, this wreck is better known as the Granite Wreck. She lies inshore and west of the Warrior Buoy in 25 feet of water. Most of her wood hull has become deteriorated or buried, but some ribs and planking can be seen on the west side of the wreck. The stern can be distinguished by some remaining steering machinery, but most of the wreck left to be explored is her cargo of granite slabs. This little wreck has become a good spot for spearfishing, especially Blackfish. She has also been a fairly productive, shallow water site for lobsters.

Excerpted from Wreck Valley CDROM by Dan Berg


 

"Dodger"

 

Type:
shipwreck, sailing ship
Depth:
100 ft

wooden


 

"Dragger"

 

Type:
shipwreck, trawler
Depth:
60 ft

upright, intact


 

"Ed's Schooner"

 

Type:
shipwreck, schooner
Depth:

wooden


 

Edwin Duke & Stone Barge

Edwin Duke

Type:
shipwreck, tugboat & barge, USA
Sunk:
1930; foundered in storm - no casualties
Depth:
55 ft

The Edwin Duke is on her starboard side, with her pilot house torn off. The wooden hull has deteriorated and is collapsing. Stone pile approximately one mile southwest is the remains of the tow.


 

"Eureka"

(c) AquaExplorers

Type:
shipwreck, trawler?, USA
Depth:
110 ft

debris field, boiler, machinery


 

"Happy Days"

 

Type:
shipwreck, schooner
Depth:
115 ft

The Happy Days appears to be the remains of a wooden schooner. The Happy Days sits in 115 feet of water just east of the G&D wreck. According to Jimmy Fazzolare this wreck consists of scattered wreckage with one mast stump sticking up. Jim reports that the wrecks bell was recovered by one of the Aquarians Club divers. Unfortunately, the bell did not have the wrecks name on it. Visibility, here is often hampered by sediment from a silty bottom. Jim reports that this wreck is one of the best lobster wrecks in the area.

from AquaExplorers / Dan Berg


 

"Harvey's Schooner"

 

Type:
shipwreck, schooner
Depth:
120 ft

The Harvey's Woody is an unidentified wooden schooner that sits in 120 feet of water about 24 miles out of Jones Inlet NY. According to diver Jim Fazzolare diver can find not only low lying ribs but a large pile of anchor chain, a large fluted anchor and winch. This wreck is excellent for lobsters.

from AquaExplorers / Dan Berg


 

"Inshore Schooner"

(c) AquaExplorers
side-scan sonar image

Type:
shipwreck, schooner
Sunk:
circa 1860; cause unknown
Depth:
35 ft

low wood debris field, bottles, coconut shells


 

Irma C

 

Type:
shipwreck, schooner
Depth:
105 ft

The Irma C, an old coal barge, rests a few miles east of the G&D wreck. Her remains have been reduced to a small low-lying patch of wreckage, so that fishing or dive boats may find it a little tricky to anchor on her.

Once in the water, divers will usually find good visibility and an abundance of marine life on this wreck which rests in 105 feet of water. The way her wooden ribs have spread out over time makes perfect homes for lobsters, which are abundant on this as well as other wrecks in the vicinity. According to diver Jim Fazzolare the wreck has a rudder covered in nets in her stern and a winch in the bow

from AquaExplorers / Dan Berg


 

"Lido" ( Coal Wreck West )

 

Type:
shipwreck, barge


 

Margaret

 

Type:
shipwreck, tugboat ?
Depth:
40 ft

This unknown vessel is listed on the charts as "Margaret", and is speculated to be a tugboat. She may be the remains of the Margaret Olsen, a small steam driven harbor boat, which collided with the tugboat Joseph A. Ginder on May 4, 1929. Visibility is usually pretty poor, 15 ft or less, and current can be a problem, due to the proximity to Deb's Inlet.


 

"Pipe Barge"

(c) AquaExplorers

Type:
shipwreck, barge
Depth:
60 ft

This is an old wooden push barge that was loaded with large pipes and other construction material. The pipes are mostly 2-4 ft in diameter, like sewer pipes. These are found in the middle of the wreck, which is mostly sunken into the sand. The bow and stern form large enclosed compartments. The stern compartment is mostly collapsed, but the bow compartment is large may be easily penetrated through an opening on the starboard side. This is probably the best place to look for lobsters, although this wreck probably gets hit once a week or more, so they are few and far between. There are also very large Blackfish in here, and all the other fish on this wreck are also very good sized.

The bottom is silty and the viz, usually not good to begin with, quickly drops to zero if you touch a fin down, so a wreck reel would be prudent. Instead of "Pipe Barge", perhaps this wreck should be known as the "Monofilament Barge", since there is so much of it about. Definitely bring a sharp knife.

Site sketch from Wreck Valley CD-ROM courtesy of Capt. Dan Berg of AquaExplorers.


 

"Reggie"

 

Type:
shipwreck
Depth:
105 ft

upside-down steel hull


 

"Seawolf"

 

Type:
shipwreck
Depth:
95 ft

The "Seawolf", as she is called, is a large steel-hulled wreck that faces in an easterly direction. Her bow rises 14 ft or so off the bottom. Most the wreck comes off the bottom only a few feet. She has a large fishing net draped over her midships.


 

"Steel Wreck"

 

Type:
shipwreck
Depth:
80 ft

This unidentified wreck known as the "Steel Wreck" is actually misnamed. She was really a wooden-hulled vessel, carrying a load of metal and wire goods. She's quite broken up, with only a few sections of ribbing and planking remaining. Pieces of her cargo are strewn about the wreckage. This is generally a good lobster wreck. It has been reported that portholes recovered from here are octagonal in shape, not circular.


 

"Three Sisters"

 

Type:
shipwreck
Depth:
80 ft

The "Three Sisters", as she is called, is an unidentified wooden-hulled vessel. She sits in 80 ft of water some 13 miles south of Atlantic Beach Inlet. She sits on a sandy bottom, spread out over a small area. Her boiler and a 4 bladed propeller are still visible. Wooden beams and planking spread out from the boilers aft towards the propeller. Occasionally some artifacts are found, mostly brass fittings. This is generally a decent wreck for lobsters and spearfishing. This wreck is in a main shipping channel, and large vessels make large wakes, so secure all gear.


 

"Train Wheel Wreck"

 

Type:
shipwreck, schooner
Depth:
120 ft

The Train Wheel Wreck is another unidentified wooden schooner. She is located in 120 feet of water only a few miles from the G&D Wreck. According to Jimmy Fazzolare divers will find a pile of train wheels and wooden debris. The Train Wheels must have been cargo. In the center of the wreck is a depression where divers can usually find big lobsters.

from AquaExplorers / Dan Berg

The American schooner W.B. Thompson is listed as sunk December 29 1866 "off Sandy Hook", with a cargo of "car wheels". In 1866, this could only mean train wheels. The same? ( 40 miles off Sandy Hook )


 

Valerie E

(c) AquaExplorers
side-scan sonar image

Type:
shipwreck, trawler, clam dredge
Specs:
( 71 ft ) 3 crew
Sunk:
Thursday January 16, 1992; winter storm - no survivors
Depth:
75 ft

The Valerie E sank in the same storm as the John Marvin, off Atlantic City. Although the Valerie E sank off Long Island, her home port was Belford NJ.

Valerie E

(c) AquaExplorersThe Valerie E was a 71 ft clam dredge that was reported overdue at 12:30 PM on January 16, 1992. At the time she had three crew men aboard. The Coast Guard located the sunken wreck the next day, but unfortunately in the frigid winter waters there was little hope for the crew. They were never recovered and are presumed lost.

(c) AquaExplorersThe wreck now sits on her port side in 75 feet of water. When we first visited this wreck in the spring of 1992 she was in near perfect condition. At that time her bronze propeller was still shiny. After a powerful Nor'easter in the fall of the same year, the wreck was moved about 200 feet inshore. Apparently the storm was so powerful that the wreck actually bounced across the bottom because one of the propeller blades bent forward 90 degrees. In 1995 the Valerie E's 600 pound, four foot diameter bronze propeller was successfully salvaged.

Excerpted from Wreck Valley CDROM by Dan Berg


 

"Wolcott"

 

Type:
shipwreck, schooner
Depth:
85 ft

The Wolcott is an unknown wooden schooner. This wreck was found and named by charter boat captain, Jay Porter on the day that Jersey Joe Wolcott beat Joe Louis in boxing's title match.

The Wolcott lies very close to the Patchogue fishing grounds, four miles northeast of the San Diego wreck in 83 feet of water. She is a big wreck, very broken up and scattered over a large area. According to Steve Bielenda a huge fluted anchor still can be seen amongst the wreckage. This area is excellent for cod, sea bass and especially lobster. In 1996 I explored this wreck for the first time. Her huge wooden ribs are almost completely buried. I located one large double posted bollard cleat and did see her anchor. The anchors flutes are completely buried with only her stock sticking out of the sand. I had heard many rumors that divers had spotted a cannon on the site. I found only a steel pipe and nothing that even resembled a cannon.

from AquaExplorers / Dan Berg

Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels Click on chart labels