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Long Island Coast Chart

Dive Sites

Long Island Shore DiverLong Island has many great sites for shore diving. Listed here are just a few for which I have scavenged descriptions. For a complete listing, pick up a copy of Dan Berg's Long Island Shore Diver at your local dive shop, or order it direct from AquaExplorers.

Do not ask for numbers - I will not give them out !



Ajace ( 'Italian Wreck' )

Long Island Coast Chart


Type:
shipwreck, sailing ship, Italy
Specs:
566 tons
Sunk:
March 4, 1881; ran aground in storm - 1 survivor
Depth:
25 ft

Also known as the Italian Wreck, the Ajace was sunk at 4:00 AM on March 4, 1881. At the time, she was carrying a small cargo of scrap railroad iron and 2,040 empty petroleum barrels. While bound for New York from Belgium, the Ajace was caught in one of the worst storms of the year and ran aground off Rockaway beach. Many sources report that Captain F. Morice, seeing that all hope was lost, opened his private supply of brandy and shared it with his crew. Soon after, the crew became badly beaten from the pounding of the waves and drunk from the brandy.

Peter Sala, who was the sole survivor of the wreck, told a dramatic story in which he denied that the crew drank from the captain's brandy. His story, reported in the NEW YORK TIMES, claimed that half the crew were washed overboard by the heavy sea which poured over her almost simultaneously. Peter and four other sailors, George the cook, Giovanni, Michael, and David managed to hang onto the after part of the vessel. They floated on a piece of wreckage for hours and were beaten, bruised, half drowned, and almost frozen to death. Finally, Michael the ship's carpenter gave up hope. He drew his knife, shouted "come, let us die together", and slit his own throat to shorten his agonizing death. Three of the crew followed the carpenter's lead. Peter Sala was rescued the next day while clinging to the floating ship's cabin.

The Ajace now rests in 25 feet of water, 300 yards west of the Granite Wreck and inshore from the Warrior buoy. Shifting sands have almost completely covered her, but divers can still find a small pile of railroad rails on this site.


Amsterdam

Long Island Coast Chart


Type:
shipwreck, freighter, Britain
Built:
1866
Specs:
( 211 x 29 ft ) 639 tons
Sunk:
Monday October 21, 1867
struck rocks in dense fog - no survivors
Depth:
20 ft

low debris field


Bayville Barge & Submarine (?)

Long Island Coast Chart


Type:
shipwreck, barge, mini submarine (?)
Depth:
25 ft

The visibility on this site varies. Average is 10-12ft. This site offers two wrecks which lie in 25 fsw. A British WWI two man reconnaissance submarine and an old wooden barge. They are both within swimming distance from each other. The marine life is fair around these wrecks. There are a few car tires between the two wrecks and you may find an occasional lobster hiding inside them. To locate the barge take a compass heading of 330 degrees from the pilings located on the east side of Greenwich Ave. It takes about 50 kick cycles to reach the wreck. To get to the submarine take a compass heading of 30 degrees from the same pilings. This can be reached in about 30 kick cycles. Both of the wrecks are not intact but make for a good dive.

Directions:
Take the LIE to exit 41 north. This is county road 106/ 107. Take this road until it splits and keep right and stay on 106. Go past Northern Blvd. And make a left on Berry Hill Rd. to the end. Make a left onto Shore Dr. and go to the end. Then make a right onto Bayville Ave. A few blocks on the left is Greenwich Ave.


Drumelzier ( 'Fire Island Wreck' )

Long Island Coast Chart

Shipwreck Drumelzier

Type:
shipwreck, freighter, England
Built:
1895, England
Specs:
( 340 x 45 ft ) 3625 gross tons, 30 crew
Sunk:
Monday December 25, 1904
ran aground in snow storm, incompetence - no casualties
Depth:
20 ft

low debris field, boiler

Shipwreck Drumelzier New York Times


East Rockaway Inlet

Long Island Coast Chart

East Rockaway Inlet
East Rockaway ( Deb's ) Inlet

East Rockaway Inlet

East Rockaway Inlet


Fire Island Inlet

Long Island Coast Chart

Fire Island Inlet


Gate City

Long Island Coast Chart

Shipwreck Gate City

Type:
shipwreck, freighter, USA
Built:
1878, Chester PA USA
Specs:
( 254 x 39 ft ) 1997 gross tons
Sunk:
Thursday February 8, 1900
ran aground in dense fog - no casualties
Depth:
25 ft

The Gate City lies about 150 ft off the beach in 20 ft of water, mostly buried in the sand, her topography changing as the sands do. The visibility is poor due to the heavy surge, which can also make the dive dangerous. There are many jagged pieces of wreckage on which to get impaled. Occasionally, artifacts of value are found. Deadeyes, portholes, and other artifacts show up after big storms uncover different sections.

Shipwreck Gate City
Back broken - beyond salvage

Shipwreck Gate City


Howard ( 'Scow Wreck' )

Long Island Coast Chart


Type:
shipwreck, tugboat, USA
Sunk:
1911
grounded in storm while salvaging Roda - no casualties
Depth:
25 ft

Hudson & East Rivers

Long Island Coast Chart

Hudson & East Rivers
The Verrazano Narrows at the mouth of the Hudson River.

Looking roughly south: Sandy Hook is barely visible at upper-right, Rockaway inlet at the upper-left, Brooklyn at lower-left, Staten Island at lower-right. The shipping channel is also plainly obvious.


Jones Inlet / 'Jones Inlet Tug'

Long Island Coast Chart

Jones Inlet

Jones Inlet

Jones Inlet Tug

Type:
shipwreck, tugboat
Depth:
20 ft

We do not know much about this little wreck. She sits in only 15-20 feet of water just outside the west edge of Jones Inlet. In fact when the wind is howling out of the east this wreck is actually protected or in the lee from Jones Inlets long East Jetty. The Tug is broken down and partly buried. She appears to be a vessel from the late 1800's.

from AquaExplorers / Dan Berg


Mattituck Inlet

Long Island Coast Chart

Mattituck Inlet


Montauk Inlet

Long Island Coast Chart

Montauk Inlet


MONTAUK TWIN JETTIES

Montauk Jetties
The Twin jetties at Montauk are truly one of the best beach dives on Long Island. Both east and west jetties are easily accessible and both are thriving with all types of marine life.

reprinted from Long Island Shore DiverLong Island Shore Diver by Dan Berg

DIRECTIONS:

( Montauk, Suffolk County )

WEST JETTY:
Take Southern State Parkway to Exit 44 East, Sunrise Highway. Stay on Sunrise to Montauk Highway and continue east into the town of Montauk. Turn left onto Edgemere Street and drive north to the end. It will have merged into West Lake Drive.

EAST JETTY:
Take Southern State Parkway to Exit 44 East, Sunrise Highway. Stay on Sunrise to Montauk Highway and continue east past the town of Montauk. Continue on Montauk Highway to East Lake Drive. Drive north on East Lake to the end.

CONDITIONS:

The twin Jetties at Montauk are truly one of the best beach dive sites on Long Island. Both East and West Jetties are easily accessible, and both are popular with local divers. Divers will find all types of marine life thriving in and around the large stones. These stones act as a fish haven and provide a solid home on the otherwise empty sand bottom.

Depth of water ranges from five to 25 feet at high tide. According to most local divers with whom I have talked, either the west side of the West Jetty, or out by the point of the West Jetty are the best potential hunting grounds for spear fishing. The East Jetty seems to be the better site for lobstering.

I have also had excellent reports from night divers who never seem to stop raving about the abundance and variety of marine life they have observed at the Montauk Twin Jetties.

AquaExplorers


Moriches Inlet

Long Island Coast Chart

Moriches Inlet

Moriches Inlet


USS Ohio

Long Island Coast Chart

Shipwreck U.S.S. Ohio

Type:
shipwreck, 74 gun ship-of-the-line, U.S. Navy
Name:
duh - Ohio
Built:
1820, Brooklyn NY USA
Specs:
( 208 x 54 ft ) 2757 gross tons
Sunk:
April 1884
set adrift and grounded by storm while being dismantled, later deliberately burned
Depth:
20 ft

The stripped hulk of the Ohio eventually burned and sank. Today nothing is left but scattered timbers and debris.


Port Jefferson Inlet

Long Island Coast Chart

Port Jefferson Inlet


Robert A. Snow ( "Derrick Barge" )

Long Island Coast Chart


Type:
shipwreck, schooner, USA
Built:
1886, Rockland ME USA
Specs:
( 225 x 37 ft ) 1556 tons
Sunk:
February 8, 1899; unknown
Depth:
23 ft

low debris field, wooden ribs, boiler


Roda

Long Island Coast Chart

Shipwreck Roda

Type:
shipwreck, freighter, England
Built:
1897, England
Specs:
( 315 x 44 ft ) 2516 gross tons
Sunk:
Thursday February 3, 1908
ran aground in heavy fog - no casualties
Depth:
20 ft

debris field, bow, stern, boiler


Rockaway Inlet

Long Island Coast Chart

Rockaway Inlet

Rockaway Inlet


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Disclaimer:

I make no claim as to the accuracy, validity, or appropriateness of any information found in this website. I will not be responsible for the consequences of any action that is based upon information found here. Scuba diving is an adventure sport, and as always, you alone are responsible for your own safety and well being.

Copyright © 1996-2016 Rich Galiano
unless otherwise noted

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