New Jersey Scuba Diving

Dive Sites - Deep Sea

Introduction

Do not ask for numbers - I will not give them out !


Atlantic Princess

Deep Sea Chart


Type:
shipwreck, trawler, clam dredge
Specs:
( 110 ft )
Depth:
170 ft


Bidevind

Deep Sea Chart

Type:
shipwreck, tanker, Norway
Built:
1938, Germany
Specs:
( 414 x 56 ft ) 4956 gross tons, 36 crew
Sunk:
Thursday April 30, 1942
torpedoed by U-752 - no casualties
Depth:
190 ft


U.S.S. Catamount - CG-85006

Deep Sea Chart

Type:
shipwreck, private yacht, converted to U.S. Navy patrol boat
Name:
Catamount is another name for a mountain lion, felis concolor.
Built:
1929, Stamford CT USA
Specs:
( 85 x 15 ft ) 67 gross tons, 11 crew
Sunk:
Saturday March 27, 1943
engine explosion - 6 casualties
Depth:
125 ft

large engine and wreckage

The wreck on this site is not actually the Catamount, but an unknown ship that is much larger, possibly a Prohibition-era rum runner. The location of the real Catamount is unknown.


Cayru

Deep Sea Chart

Type:
shipwreck, freighter, Brazil
Built:
1919, Hog Island PA USA, as Scanmail
Specs:
( 390 x 54 ft ) 5152 gross tons, 83 passengers & crew
Sunk:
Sunday March 8, 1942
torpedoed by U-94 - 53 casualties
Depth:
125-140 ft

The exact location of the Cayru is unknown; the location plotted is one of several wrecks thought to be it. If found, the wreck may be identified by its steam turbine engines, which are distinctly different from piston steam engines.


Charles Morand

Deep Sea Chart


Type:
shipwreck, iron-hulled screw steamer, USA
Built:
1884, Scotland
Specs:
( 200 x 27 ft ) 761 gross tons
Sunk:
Saturday July 26, 1890
collision with schooner Zacheus Sherman - no casualties
Depth:
160 ft

contiguous but broken down


U.S.S. Cherokee ( 'Gunboat' )

Deep Sea Chart

Type:
shipwreck, tugboat, US Navy
Name:
An Indian tribe of Pennsylvania and New York, later relocated to Oklahoma.
Built:
1891, Camden NJ USA, as Edgar F. Luckenbach
Specs:
( 120 x 25 ft ) 272 gross tons, 20 crew
Sunk:
Tuesday July 26, 1918
foundered in storm - 10 survivors
Depth:
90 ft

Today the Cherokee sits upright on the bottom in 90-100 ft. of water. Her hull is pretty much intact. The port bow breaks up a little bit. Her stern offers the highest relief, some 15 ft. The visibility is generally pretty good. She is on a sandy rather than muddy bottom. The boilers are still visible inside the wreck, where one is covered by an old fishing net. Artifacts can still be found - pottery and brass. The deck gun is still attached to the bow, however, it hangs over the port side. Three-inch shells can be found in the sand. She is usually a good photography and spearfishing wreck.


The gun - long since carted away


Corvallis

Deep Sea Chart


Type:
shipwreck, freighter, USA
Built:
1919, Portland OR USA
Specs:
( 267 x 49 ft ) 2992 gross tons, no crew
Sunk:
Tuesday June 16, 1925
deliberate - for film "The Half Way Girl"
Depth:
140 ft

wooden-hulled, exact location unknown


Durley Chine ( 'Bacardi' )

Deep Sea Chart


Type:
shipwreck, tanker, England
Built:
1913, England
Specs:
( 279 x 40 ft ) 1918 gross tons, 28 crew
Sunk:
Sunday April 30, 1917
collision with steamer Harlem - no casualties
Depth:
185 ft


Galimore's Cayru

Deep Sea Chart


Type:
shipwreck, sailing ship
Depth:
140 ft

a "massive" wooden wreck, at first thought to be the Cayru


Herbert Parker

Deep Sea Chart


Type:
shipwreck, freighter ?
Depth:
180 ft

A large steel wreck, possibly of World War II vintage, with 30-40 ft of relief.


Hvoslef

Deep Sea Chart

Type:
shipwreck, freighter, Norway
Built:
1927, England
Specs:
( 255 x 35 ft ) 1630 gross tons, 20 crew
Sunk:
Tuesday March 10, 1942
torpedoed by U-94 - 6 casualties
Depth:
140 ft

Today the Hvoslef sits in 140 ft of water on a sandy bottom. She is in one large piece but not intact. Her bow is the most recognizable feature. It sits upright with a starboard list. Her midsection is torn open and her large boilers are visible. She can be easily penetrated. There is some debris about most noticeably large pipes. She has a fishing net draped over some sections, and her stern collapses into the sand. Artifacts are found occasionally.


India Arrow

Deep Sea Chart

Type:
shipwreck, tanker, USA
Built:
1921, Quincy MA USA
Specs:
( 468 x 62 ft ) 8327 gross tons, 38 crew
Sunk:
Wednesday February 4, 1942
torpedoed by U-103 - 12 survivors
Depth:
190 ft




The propeller, with one broken blade



Maiden Creek

Deep Sea Chart

Type:
freighter
Built:
1919, Hog Island PA USA
Specs:
( 390 x 54 ft ) 5031 gross tons, 56 crew
Sunk:
Thursday December 31, 1942
torpedoed by unknown U-boat - 25 casualties
Depth:
225 ft
Type:
shipwreck, freighter, USA
Built:
1919, Hog Island PA, USA
Specs:
( 390 x 54 ft ) 5031 gross tons, 60 crew
Sunk:
Thursday December 31, 1942
foundered, 29 casualties
Depth:
unknown

U.S.S. Moonstone - PYc-9

Deep Sea Chart

Type:
shipwreck, patrol boat, U.S. Navy (converted yacht)
Built:
1929, Germany, as Lone Star
Specs:
( 171 x 26 ft ) 469 gross tons, 47 crew
Sunk:
Friday October 15, 1943
collision with destroyer USS Greer ( 1090 tons) - no casualties
Depth:
130 ft

Today the Moonstone lies in 130 ft on a sandy bottom, intact and upright. The gaping hole in her port side gives clear evidence of the collision, and the engine room can be accessed by entering the impact site. Caution is advised because of loose debris, and wire cable in which to get entangled is everywhere. Her stern still has depth charges lined up in racks. The midsection superstructure has fallen into the compartments below. Her deck in some places rises almost 35 ft off the sand. The 3 inch deck gun still stands on her bow, just behind a hatch which leads to the crews quarters. Her safe was recovered in 1985, and with it some jewelry, coins, and wartime artifacts. Visibility is best just before the end of and incoming tide.


Norness

Deep Sea Chart

Type:
shipwreck, tanker, Panama
Built:
1939, Germany
Specs:
( 493 x 65 ft ) 9577 tons
Sunk:
Wednesday January 14, 1942
torpedoed and shelled by U-123 - the first loss of World War II in U.S. waters
Depth:
280 ft, min 210 ft

The Norness is generally ignored by divers, because of the proximity of the much more tempting Andrea Doria. The U-123 went on to sink the Coimbra the next day.


Looking down the port-side companionway


Looking up from under the stern

Courtesy of Dan Crowell


Rio Tercero

Deep Sea Chart

Type:
shipwreck, freighter, Argentina
Built:
1912, England, as Fortunstella
Specs:
( 405 x 54 ft ) 4864 gross tons
Sunk:
Monday June 22, 1942
torpedoed by U-202 - 5 casualties
Depth:
400 ft or perhaps thousands


Sebastian

Deep Sea Chart

Type:
shipwreck, tanker, England
Built:
1914, England
Specs:
( 310 ft ) 3110 tons, 36 crew
Sunk:
Thursday May 10, 1917
fire - 1 casualty
Depth:
270 ft


The aft deck gun of the Royal Navy tanker Sebastian

Courtesy of Dan Crowell


Sommerstad ( 'Virginia' )

Deep Sea Chart

Type:
shipwreck, freighter, England
Built:
1906, England
Specs:
( 340 x 47 ft ) 3875 gross tons, 31 crew
Sunk:
Monday August 12, 1918
torpedoed by U-117 - no casualties
Depth:
180 ft

Suffolk

Deep Sea Chart

Type:
shipwreck, collier, USA
Built:
1911, Camden NJ USA
Specs:
( 365 ft ) 6798 tons, 37 crew
Sunk:
Saturday December 11, 1943
foundered in storm - no survivors
Depth:
180 ft

partially intact, upside-down




Courtesy of Dan Crowell


Thomas Hebert

Deep Sea Chart

Type:
shipwreck, tugboat
Built:
1975, Orange TX USA
Specs:
( 89 x 27 ft ) 99 tons, 7 crew
Sunk:
Sunday March 7, 1993
cause unknown - two survivors
Depth:
140 ft

The intact wreck of this tugboat was found with its floating barge still attached by the tow cable. It has been suggested that a submerged Navy submarine snagged the tow cable and caused the tug to be pulled under. Coincidentally, there were reports of a damaged submarine entering port a few days later.

A more likely explanation is that the tug experienced a steering or propulsion problem, and either stopped in the water or turned tight around. In either case, the much bigger barge would keep going under its own inertia, and either run down the tug, or "trip" it, pulling the tow cable sideways so as to capsize the tug. The Thomas Hebert sank once before due to just this sort of accident, but was raised. She is now completely upside-down and sunk into the mud.

Details courtesy of Capt. Duane Clause of the dive boat Porthole II, who did the original investigation after the sinking.


'West Wreck'

Deep Sea Chart


Type:
shipwreck
Depth:
210 ft

unidentified wooden wreck

So-named because it is west of several well-known wrecks, such as the Texas Tower and the Bidevind.




Disclaimer:

I make no claim as to the accuracy, validity, or appropriateness of any information found in this website. I will not be responsible for the consequences of any action that is based upon information found here. Scuba diving is an adventure sport, and as always, you alone are responsible for your own safety and well being.

Copyright © 1996-2015 Rich Galiano
unless otherwise noted

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since May 05, 2015